Home with no Home

Home with no Home

The world population of street or community children stands at 150 million and is rising each year. Of these about 40% (65 million) are homeless and familyless whilst the balance works on the streets helping to support their families. They do not attend school, are at risk from the street enviromen...

Changing their Lives

Changing their Lives

The United Nations states that all children have the right to a safe and secure childhood. Article 27 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) asserts that States Parties recognize the right of every child to a standard of living adequate for the child's physical, mental, spiritu...

20% GDP

20% GDP

Street and working children contribute as much as 20% of India's GDP, rag picking, luggage carrying, selling newspapers and flowers, pickpocketing, pimping or just plain begging. Street children make up a considerable proportion of this figure. They can be seen everywhere - at stations, bus stops a...

Welcome

Slumdogs takes its inspiration from Slumdog Millionaire and the story of a street child making it in the modern work.

By supporting our charities and their children, you help give the children their chance in life and also a happy and secure childhood. It is difficult to estimate the number of children who are homeless in India; their mobility and the overwhelming number of homeless defy surveys. UNICEF estimated in 1994 - the latest year for which figures are available - that India has 11 million homeless children, with a significant percentage living in urban areas. This is a tenth of the world's 110 million homeless children.

Some are orphans, some kicked out of sometimes violent or broken homes. Many travel via train away from their communities where they are prey to brothel keepers or the criminal gangs who control begging in the cities.

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Slum Dogs - giving the street children of India a chance
Welcome
Welcome to the Slumdogs.org website. You may have watched Slumdog Millionaire or read many of the articles about the plight and fate of the many street children and homeless children of India and wanted to find out what you could do to help
 
Home with no Home
The world population of street or community children stands at 150 million and is rising each year. Of these about 40% (65 million) are homeless and familyless whilst the balance works on the streets helping to support their families. They do not attend school, are at risk from the street enviroment and have poor adult prospects, locked as they are into a cycle of poverty.

Increasingly, these children are the defenseless victims of brutal violence, sexual exploitation, abject neglect, chemical addiction, and human rights violations.

Street children is a term used to refer to children who live on the streets. They are deprived of family care and protection. Most children on the streets are between the ages of 10 and 14 years old, and their populace between different cities is varied. Street children, or "street urchins", are, in particular, those that are not taken care of by parents or other protective guardians. Street children live in abandoned buildings, containers, automobiles, parks, or on the street itself. A great deal has been written defining street children, but the primary difficulty is that there are no precise categories, but rather a continuum, ranging from children who spend some time in the streets and sleep in a house with ill-prepared adults, to those who live entirely in the streets and have no adult supervision or care.

A widely accepted set of definitions, commonly attributed to UNICEF, defines street children into two main categories:

  1. Children on the street are those engaged in some kind of economic activity ranging from begging to vending. Most go home at the end of the day and contribute their earnings to their family. They may be attending school and retain a sense of belonging to a family. Because of the economic fragility of the family, these children may eventually opt for a permanent life on the streets.
  2. Children of the street actually live on the street (or outside of a normal family environment). Family ties may exist but are tenuous and are maintained only casually or occasionally.

Street children exist in many major cities, especially in developing countries, and may be the subject of abuse, neglect, exploitation, or even in extreme cases murder by "clean up squads" hired by local businesses.

 

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